In addition to fiber mode, outdoor/indoor application s and tubing type, it is important one is aware of some of the other specifications when choosing telecommunication cables – cladding/core size, LAN/WAN applications, and the number of optical fibers required.

When you want to purchase optic fiber cable, it is vital that one have the size of the fiber stand required specified. This is actually specified by the cladding size ratio/core size ratio.

Right after the fiber strand size is chosen, it is important that the number of fibers that are required in a single cable be defined. This depends on the application because the design might require two or more fibers and this may be packed all in a single package.

The variations in the amounts of cables are:

Simplex cable – The simplex cable has just one optic fiber strand. An example of how the structure of this particular kind of cable is explained here.

Duplex cables – the duplex cables accommodate two buffered optical fibers in just one jacket. The cable is employed for LAN backbone use since this use requires two fibers – two fibers for the reception and transmission. It is quite convenient that have two simplex cables pulled. It is important you take note of the fact that cables should be present inside a single jacket.

Multifiber – the multifiber contains 2 or more fibers all in a single jacket. The number of fibers could be in hundreds; nonetheless, it is observed that the fibers are always in even numbers, owing to the fact that most applications need one fiber for the reception and the other for the transmission.

With the arrival of fiber optic connections and the high speeds offered by these, the best we can do to make the most of them is to connect our devices directly by network cable to the router, since the other ways to connect to it, For example, Wi-Fi, except under very specific conditions when using high-end devices will not be able to offer us even half the speed we really have.

Although we connect by network cable, not all cables are the same, so to avoid problems we will explain the main differences between the most used cables and, above all, help you choose which network cable is best suited to your connection to the internet.

When choosing the best network cable for our Internet connection we must choose between different categories, however, we may not know the differences between them beyond the name.

The category of a network cable allows us to know the minimum speed that we will obtain with it when using it in distances less than 100 meters. There are cables from category 1 to category 7a, however, the best known and used, especially in domestic environments, are categories 5, 5e, 6 and 6a.

Although it is possible that in practice we can obtain something more (at least in very short distances), in a maximum distance of 100 meters, the speed guaranteed by the network cables according to their category are, for example, Category 5 – 100Mbps.

In short distances within a floor, this category serves us perfectly, however, if we are going to cover a distance greater than 50 meters or to use the cable outdoors or in places with a lot of interference (for example, inside outlets), the The best option is to opt for a Category 6 cable, which will ensure that we can take advantage of 100% of our connection and, above all, our local network.

In short distances within a floor, this category serves us perfectly, however, if we are going to cover a distance greater than 50 meters or to use the cable outdoors or in places with a lot of interference.

In addition to the category, the cables have physical properties such as the thickness of the wires, if they are twisted or have an aluminum screen to reduce inter-couple and electromagnetic interference from the outside.
The wires of the network cables are usually twisted in pairs in order to minimize interferences between them and between the external cables.

The higher and more frequent the braid, the lower the interference and better results will be given by the network cable, especially over long distances or in environments with electromagnetic noise (electrical installations, for example).

Normal cables do not usually have any type of shielding or metallic coating, however, if you look at the high-quality cables, we will find several different types of shielding, for example, UTP: Does not include any screen.
This shielding is essential whenever we are going to use the cable on the outside or if we are going to, for example, use the cable on the outside or if we are going to put it next to the electric cables since we will avoid interference in the data transfer.